PhoneRank™: How Are RF Safe Phone Scores Calculated?

Introducing the RF Safe Score aka PhoneRank: A Single Score Rating System for SAR Values

PhoneRank is based on an RF Safe Score, an algorithm RF Safe uses to rank cellular phones based on their official FCC SAR test results. It is named after the term “RF” and the goal for all consumer wireless products to be “Safe.” RF Safe Score is a way of measuring the potential risk of cell phone usage over a lifetime.

According to RF Safe: RF Safe Score works by counting the number of thresholds surpassed for each test representing segments of the population not currently considered to use a wireless device according to FCC guidelines (women and children) to determine a rough estimate of how much of an impact a phone’s use could have over long periods of time. The underlying assumption is that children absorb more radiation than adults, for which the FCC test is designed, not children.[1] Currently, the RF Safe score is the only algorithm used by Cellularphone.org when ranking phone search results by potential health risks.

 

The RF Safe Score is a rating system that allows consumers to easily compare the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) values of different phone models and make informed decisions about their phone use. To create the RF Safe Score, the team behind it collected SAR test data for decades of phones and determined the SAR values for each phone at different positions on the body, such as the head or body. They also took into account the different skull thicknesses of different age groups, including 0.05mm for 5-year-olds, 1.0mm for 10-year-olds, and 2.0mm for adults.

The SAR value of a mobile phone can vary depending on the thickness of the skull. A user’s brain with a thicker skull will generally absorb less RF energy when using a phone than a thinner skull. To account for these differences in skull thickness, the RF Safe Score assigns different weights to the SAR values depending on the thickness of the skull. For example, the SAR value of a phone will be given a higher weight when it is held to the head of a 5-year-old with a thin skull than when it is held to the head of an adult with a thicker skull. This reflects the increased RF energy absorption in the first scenario.

The RF Safe Score assigns points to each phone based on its SAR values, with lower SAR values receiving higher points and higher SAR values receiving lower points. The overall RF Safe Score for each phone is calculated by summing the points assigned for each position, allowing users to easily compare the SAR values of different phones and make informed decisions about which ones to use. The RF Safe Score is intended to help consumers make more informed choices about their phone use and reduce potential health risks associated with RF energy absorption.

 

Are you concerned about the potential health effects of using a mobile phone? One way to assess the potential risk of RF energy absorption is by looking at a phone’s specific absorption rate (SAR) value. SAR measures the amount of RF energy absorbed by the body when using a cellular phone.

Several SAR tests are performed to determine a phone’s RF Safe Score. These tests include:

  • Head SAR: This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is held to the head.
  • Body SAR: This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is placed on the body, such as in a pocket or purse.
  • Hotspot: This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is used as a hotspot to transmit data to other devices.
  • Head SAR (Simultaneous Mode): This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is held to the head, and all transmitters are active.
  • Body SAR (Simultaneous Mode): This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is placed on the body, and all transmitters are active.
  • Hotspot (Simultaneous Mode): This test measures the SAR value of a phone when it is used as a hotspot to transmit data to other devices, and all transmitters are active.

However, comparing SAR values can be difficult, as they are typically reported differently by different manufacturers. That’s why we are excited to introduce the RF Safe Score, a single-score rating system that makes it easy to compare the SAR values of different phones.

To create the RF Safe Score, we collected SAR test data for decades of phones and determined the SAR values for each phone at different positions on the body (e.g., head, body, etc.). We also considered the different skull thicknesses of different age groups, including 0.05mm for 5-year-olds, 1.0mm for 10-year-olds, and 2.0mm for adults. The SAR value of a mobile phone can vary depending on the thickness of the skull. A user’s brain with a thicker skull will generally absorb less RF energy than a thinner skull when using a mobile phone. To account for these differences in skull thickness, the RF Safe Score assigns different weights to the SAR values depending on the thickness of the skull. For example, the SAR value of a phone will be given a higher weight when it is held to the head of a 5-year-old with a thin skull than when it is held to the head of an adult with a thicker skull. This reflects the head’s increased RF energy absorption in the first scenario.

Using this information, we established a scoring system that assigns points to each phone based on its SAR values. Phones with lower SAR values are assigned higher points, while phones with higher SAR values are assigned lower points. The overall RF Safe Score for each phone is calculated by summing the points assigned for each position. The resulting scores allow you to easily compare the SAR values of different phones and make informed decisions about which ones to use.

We hope that the RF Safe Score will help consumers make more informed choices about the phones they use and reduce any potential health risks associated with RF energy absorption. Stay tuned for more information on where the RF Safe Score is used online and which phones score the highest (or lowest).

 

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RF Safe scores are calculated using a variety of factors that reflect a cellular phone’s worthiness, including their SAR rank, percent of the legal limit per test, number of warnings reached per SAR test, brand SAR history, and independent SAR data when available.

The exact formula used to calculate an RF Safe score can vary depending on the version of the scoring model being used. However, generally speaking, RF Safe scores are calculated using the following steps:

  • Collect SAR data: The FCC is the government regulatory agency that requires SAR data on every phone sold in the USA. Phone manufacturer radiation levels are made public records.
  • Organize SAR data: The SAR data is organized into categories, such as 5-year-olds, 10-year-olds, and adults.
  • Calculate the RF Safe score: The SAR data is plugged into an RF Safe scoring model, which calculates the RF Safe score based on the weightings assigned to each category.
  • Adjust the RF Safe score: The RF Safe score may be adjusted based on additional factors, such as changes in the official government-accepted stance on cell phone radiation or undisputable scientific knowledge.
Accepted Warning For Cell Phone Level Radiation – Group 2B: The agent is possibly carcinogenic to humans.

This group category is used for agents for which there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans.

RF Safe scores give smartphone users a quick and easy way to gauge a phone’s worthiness from a quality-of-life perspective. RF Safe scores are numerical summaries of a smartphone’s SAR test history used to predict the likelihood of physical harm from cellular phone use.  A higher RF Safe score generally indicates a lower risk, i.e., a five-star rating, while a lower RF Safe score indicates a higher risk.

By using RF Safe scores, cellular phone users can quickly assess the potential impacts on their quality of life and make informed cellular phone usage decisions. This helps cellular phone users determine a safe distance, such as opting to use the speakerphone or anti-radiation safety accessories to reduce risk in weak signal areas.

RF Safe scores make it easier for cellular phone users to make informed SAR level (Phone Radiation Level) decisions by providing them with a summary of all the SAR test data available for any phone sold in the USA put through an algorithm that gives SAR meaning to consumers.

 

 

RF safe made it possible to create a single score rating system for the specific absorption rate (SAR) test results of phones. SAR is a measure of the amount of radio frequency (RF) energy absorbed by the body when using a mobile phone.

To create a single-score rating system for SAR test results:

  1. Collect SAR test data for a variety of phones.
  2. Determine the SAR values for each phone at different positions on the body (e.g., head, body, etc.).
  3. Establish a scoring system that assigns points to each phone based on its SAR values. For example, phones with lower SAR values could be assigned higher points, while phones with higher SAR values could be assigned lower points.
  4. Calculate the overall score for each phone by summing the points assigned to it for each position.
  5. Rank the phones based on their overall scores, with higher scores indicating lower SAR values and lower risk of RF energy absorption.

It is important to note that there are currently no internationally recognized standards for SAR ratings, so a single-score rating system was developed specifically for this purpose. Additionally, the SAR values of a phone may vary depending on the specific frequency and power level of the RF signal being transmitted, as well as the specific location of the phone on the body.